Montaigne essays of pedantry

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Even if I had stuck to my original plan of doing nothing with this website except provide an archive for my own work, a section for Essays, like a section for Poetry, would have been at the centre of the enterprise, as an equal half of a twin heart. But I was not long embarked on building the Essays section when I saw the necessity of providing small anthologies of articles by Guest Writers, and then later I got the idea of pointing to individual essays (Prose Finds) that might serve as a gangway into the viewpoint, or field of expertise, represented by that particular author. Eventually there might be a further classification in which I can enshrine, with a short introductory essay, yet further essays by writers in the past. Essays about essays, all the way back to Montaigne. His face is on this page because he was the founding father of the essay as we know it today. Nowadays most essays are first composed as journalism of one kind or another, but we should never forget that the man who had the idea kept his work for himself until he thought it good enough for a book. The affinity of the essay with the poem was thus made clear at the outset.

Quotidiana (kwo•ti•de•A•na) N. 1. The land of everyday, commonplace things; 2. The online compendium of 420 public-domain essays . Featuring

Out of this utopian vision of noble savages in the state of nature Shakespeare crafts the words he gives to the good councillor Gonzalo who is daydreaming about what he would do were he in charge of colonising the island on which he and the others have been shipwrecked:

Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (28 February 1533 – 13 September 1592) was one of the most significant philosophers of the French Renaissance, known for popularizing the essay as a literary genre. His work is noted for its merging of casual anecdotes and autobiography with serious intellectual insight; his massive volume Essais (translated literally as "Attempts" or "Trials") contains some of the most influential essays ever written. Montaigne had a direct influence on writers all over the world, including Francis Bacon, René Descartes, Blaise Pascal, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Albert Hirschman, William Hazlitt, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Friedrich Nietzsche, Stefan Zweig, Eric Hoffer, Isaac Asimov, and possibly on the later works of William Shakespeare. In his own lifetime, Montaigne was admired more as a statesman than as an author. The tendency in his essays to digress into anecdotes and personal ruminations was seen as detrimental to proper style rather than as an innovation, and his declaration that, "I am myself the matter of my book", was viewed by his contemporaries as self-indulgent. In time, however, Montaigne would come to be recognized as embodying, perhaps better than any other author of his time, the spirit of freely entertaining doubt which began to emerge at that time. He is most famously known for his skeptical remark, "Que sçay-je?" ("What do I know?", in Middle French; now rendered as Que sais-je? in modern French). -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Taschenbuch .

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montaigne essays of pedantry

Montaigne essays of pedantry

Out of this utopian vision of noble savages in the state of nature Shakespeare crafts the words he gives to the good councillor Gonzalo who is daydreaming about what he would do were he in charge of colonising the island on which he and the others have been shipwrecked:

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montaigne essays of pedantry

Montaigne essays of pedantry

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montaigne essays of pedantry

Montaigne essays of pedantry

Quotidiana (kwo•ti•de•A•na) N. 1. The land of everyday, commonplace things; 2. The online compendium of 420 public-domain essays . Featuring

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montaigne essays of pedantry
Montaigne essays of pedantry

Out of this utopian vision of noble savages in the state of nature Shakespeare crafts the words he gives to the good councillor Gonzalo who is daydreaming about what he would do were he in charge of colonising the island on which he and the others have been shipwrecked:

Action Action

Montaigne essays of pedantry

Action Action

montaigne essays of pedantry

Montaigne essays of pedantry

Even if I had stuck to my original plan of doing nothing with this website except provide an archive for my own work, a section for Essays, like a section for Poetry, would have been at the centre of the enterprise, as an equal half of a twin heart. But I was not long embarked on building the Essays section when I saw the necessity of providing small anthologies of articles by Guest Writers, and then later I got the idea of pointing to individual essays (Prose Finds) that might serve as a gangway into the viewpoint, or field of expertise, represented by that particular author. Eventually there might be a further classification in which I can enshrine, with a short introductory essay, yet further essays by writers in the past. Essays about essays, all the way back to Montaigne. His face is on this page because he was the founding father of the essay as we know it today. Nowadays most essays are first composed as journalism of one kind or another, but we should never forget that the man who had the idea kept his work for himself until he thought it good enough for a book. The affinity of the essay with the poem was thus made clear at the outset.

Action Action

montaigne essays of pedantry

Montaigne essays of pedantry

Quotidiana (kwo•ti•de•A•na) N. 1. The land of everyday, commonplace things; 2. The online compendium of 420 public-domain essays . Featuring

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montaigne essays of pedantry

Montaigne essays of pedantry

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Montaigne essays of pedantry

Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (28 February 1533 – 13 September 1592) was one of the most significant philosophers of the French Renaissance, known for popularizing the essay as a literary genre. His work is noted for its merging of casual anecdotes and autobiography with serious intellectual insight; his massive volume Essais (translated literally as "Attempts" or "Trials") contains some of the most influential essays ever written. Montaigne had a direct influence on writers all over the world, including Francis Bacon, René Descartes, Blaise Pascal, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Albert Hirschman, William Hazlitt, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Friedrich Nietzsche, Stefan Zweig, Eric Hoffer, Isaac Asimov, and possibly on the later works of William Shakespeare. In his own lifetime, Montaigne was admired more as a statesman than as an author. The tendency in his essays to digress into anecdotes and personal ruminations was seen as detrimental to proper style rather than as an innovation, and his declaration that, "I am myself the matter of my book", was viewed by his contemporaries as self-indulgent. In time, however, Montaigne would come to be recognized as embodying, perhaps better than any other author of his time, the spirit of freely entertaining doubt which began to emerge at that time. He is most famously known for his skeptical remark, "Que sçay-je?" ("What do I know?", in Middle French; now rendered as Que sais-je? in modern French). -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Taschenbuch .

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Montaigne essays of pedantry

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