Gatsby essay

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  • Andrew Scott played Gatsby in the 2012 two-part BBC Radio 4 Classic Serial production. [12]

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    The textual form of these texts is reflective of the time period they belong to. This is particularly exemplified in the TGG as it is a novel, which demonstrates the partying and recklessness of the Jazz age through characters such as Daisy, Tom and Gatsby, and the lack of importance placed on the meaning of love. EBB’s sonnets however, reflect societies views through formal language and the strength and passion that is associated with love. EBB opens the sonnet sequence by placing herself in the tradition of pastoral love poetry. She enters this tradition to write her own story, which begins as, ‘the sweet years, the dear and wished-for years’. This however is transformed in the second quatrain when they become ‘the sad years, the melancholy years’. This first sonnet recounts the moment the speaker is overcome by love. This strong love that is portrayed and physically and emotionally sought after throughout the sonnets contrasts the aspects of love that is demonstrated in TGG. In chapter two, the valley of the ashes is introduced as a place of desolation and poverty. Nick (the narrator) discovers Tom is having an affair on his cousin Daisy and is immediately bought into a new world of drama, materialism and lies, which he was not
    accustomed to. These opposing views in the texts are enhanced by what was accepted in society during the time period. In Sonnet XIV, the speaker implicity responds to praise and words of love from the beloved. She doesn’t want to be placed on any kind of pedestal over looks, intelligence or being the perfect lover. She states, ‘Don’t love me for my looks, the sound of my voice or the way I think’. EBB weaves rhyme and alliteration to make her thoughts memorable and powerful. This sonnet powerfully echoes against TGG where both the narrator and Gatsby give Daisy the aura of the idealized women, ‘the golden girl’. The novel however never gives her a voice, an equal one to those of Nick and Gatsby. Her cry of ‘you want too much’ is never heard in the novel. In the world that Fitzgerald creates, physical perfection is significant. Myrtle falls in love with Tom’s clothing and appearance and falls out of love with her husband shortly after her wedding when she finds out his wedding suit was borrowed. This materialistic view is emphasized throughout the novel with importance placed on all characters looking their best at all times. This contrasts with Sonnet XXXII as EBB stresses that love is, at least in her case, a love between imperfect people, certainly people with imperfect bodies. It is the spiritual dimension of love towards which she turns her attention. The Speaker believed that just as love blossomed so suddenly, it must die just as suddenly for him. In the second Quatrain she sees herself as ‘an out of tune worn/viol’ that must soon be laid down. She now accepts this opinion of hers wronged him by refusing to believe in his sincerity or his capacity for love. Related posts:

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gatsby essay

Gatsby essay

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Gatsby essay

Andrew Scott played Gatsby in the 2012 two-part BBC Radio 4 Classic Serial production. [12]

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Gatsby essay

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Gatsby essay

The textual form of these texts is reflective of the time period they belong to. This is particularly exemplified in the TGG as it is a novel, which demonstrates the partying and recklessness of the Jazz age through characters such as Daisy, Tom and Gatsby, and the lack of importance placed on the meaning of love. EBB’s sonnets however, reflect societies views through formal language and the strength and passion that is associated with love. EBB opens the sonnet sequence by placing herself in the tradition of pastoral love poetry. She enters this tradition to write her own story, which begins as, ‘the sweet years, the dear and wished-for years’. This however is transformed in the second quatrain when they become ‘the sad years, the melancholy years’. This first sonnet recounts the moment the speaker is overcome by love. This strong love that is portrayed and physically and emotionally sought after throughout the sonnets contrasts the aspects of love that is demonstrated in TGG. In chapter two, the valley of the ashes is introduced as a place of desolation and poverty. Nick (the narrator) discovers Tom is having an affair on his cousin Daisy and is immediately bought into a new world of drama, materialism and lies, which he was not
accustomed to. These opposing views in the texts are enhanced by what was accepted in society during the time period. In Sonnet XIV, the speaker implicity responds to praise and words of love from the beloved. She doesn’t want to be placed on any kind of pedestal over looks, intelligence or being the perfect lover. She states, ‘Don’t love me for my looks, the sound of my voice or the way I think’. EBB weaves rhyme and alliteration to make her thoughts memorable and powerful. This sonnet powerfully echoes against TGG where both the narrator and Gatsby give Daisy the aura of the idealized women, ‘the golden girl’. The novel however never gives her a voice, an equal one to those of Nick and Gatsby. Her cry of ‘you want too much’ is never heard in the novel. In the world that Fitzgerald creates, physical perfection is significant. Myrtle falls in love with Tom’s clothing and appearance and falls out of love with her husband shortly after her wedding when she finds out his wedding suit was borrowed. This materialistic view is emphasized throughout the novel with importance placed on all characters looking their best at all times. This contrasts with Sonnet XXXII as EBB stresses that love is, at least in her case, a love between imperfect people, certainly people with imperfect bodies. It is the spiritual dimension of love towards which she turns her attention. The Speaker believed that just as love blossomed so suddenly, it must die just as suddenly for him. In the second Quatrain she sees herself as ‘an out of tune worn/viol’ that must soon be laid down. She now accepts this opinion of hers wronged him by refusing to believe in his sincerity or his capacity for love. Related posts:

  • The Great Gatsby Chapter 8 Summary
  • Character Essay: Gatsby
  • Summary of the Great Gatsby
  • The Great Gatsby
  • Motif Affairs: The Great Gatsby
  • The Great Gatsby
  • The great Gatsby american dream
  • Gatsby and Browning Practice
  • Great Gatsby American Dream Essay
  • An Analysis of Tragic Love between Gatsby and Daisy
  • Parallels Between "The Hollow Men" and the Great Gatsby
  • Compare and Contrast Gatsby and Tom
Recent posts:
  • Religious Speech Given on Homeschool Graduation - Example Ideas
  • Debate Speech Topics - Example Ideas
  • Interesting Speech Topics - 3 Ways to Come Up With Great Example Ideas
  • Describe an important character in Freedom Writers
  • A Little Night Music
  • The Unthinkable
  • Analysis of a charity appeal
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