Films are better than books essay

Rothman quickly announces a real eye with the shot of downtown Los Angeles that opens The Velvet Vampire , a vestigial crucifix jutting high above a precinct of modernist architecture like a remnant of old faith in an otherwise oblivious world. Zoom back to reveal the busy thrum of midday in the city, and then a slow dissolve into the same shot at night, cars and pedestrians becoming ghosts and then fading into oblivion, the buildings readily transmuted into a field of Neolithic standing stones, an arena ready for a primal blood rite. A small squiggle of red strides across the frame upon the pavement: our antiheroine, Diane Le Fanu (Celeste Yarnall). Diane sees a parked motorcycle and correctly anticipates danger. A wild and hairy biker, some escapee of Corman’s The Wild Angels (1967) at war with all civilised mores, quickly obliges as he tackles and tries to rape the chicly dressed lady. But Diane quickly turns the tables, jamming the biker’s own knife into his gut. Diane picks herself up, washes off in a nearby fountain, and casually proceeds on her way. She enters an art gallery where her friend Carl Stoker (Gene Shane) is curating an exhibition, and encounters a young couple, Lee and Susan Ritter (Michael Blodgett and Sherry Miles). Lee and Susan amiably play at being strangers who flirt over the art works whilst trying to fit in with the arty crowd: “I get a lot of sensual energy from it,” Susan comments in regarding a sculpture that resembles the lower half of a bisected female body with legs splayed. Carl introduces them to Diane, whilst old blues man Johnny Shines (playing himself) regales the uptown crowd with elemental tales of evil ladies and demon lovers. Diane invites Lee and Susan out to her home in the California desert with a flirtatious intensity that easily hooks Lee, and the couple, who uneasily fancy themselves swingers, accept the invitation.

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Cape Fear , 1991
Based on John MacDonald’s novel and the 1962 flick starring Gregory Peck, 1991’s psychological-thriller Cape Fear saw Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese collaborate. The former plays a knife-wielding convict seeking revenge on his lawyer and his family, after being released from prison. The truly terrifying riverboat finale cements this one as a sure-fire success.

It was that they’re still here, almost as good as new, 60 years later. And I’m not sure that we can say that with any confidence at all about any of our digital pictures or films.

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films are better than books essay

Films are better than books essay

It was that they’re still here, almost as good as new, 60 years later. And I’m not sure that we can say that with any confidence at all about any of our digital pictures or films.

Action Action

films are better than books essay

Films are better than books essay

Action Action

films are better than books essay

Films are better than books essay

Cape Fear , 1991
Based on John MacDonald’s novel and the 1962 flick starring Gregory Peck, 1991’s psychological-thriller Cape Fear saw Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese collaborate. The former plays a knife-wielding convict seeking revenge on his lawyer and his family, after being released from prison. The truly terrifying riverboat finale cements this one as a sure-fire success.

Action Action

films are better than books essay
Films are better than books essay

It was that they’re still here, almost as good as new, 60 years later. And I’m not sure that we can say that with any confidence at all about any of our digital pictures or films.

Action Action

Films are better than books essay

Action Action

films are better than books essay

Films are better than books essay

© , Inc. or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Box Office Mojo and IMDb are trademarks or registered trademarks of , Inc. or its affiliates. Terms of Use and Privacy Policy under which this service is provided to you.

Action Action

films are better than books essay

Films are better than books essay

Cape Fear , 1991
Based on John MacDonald’s novel and the 1962 flick starring Gregory Peck, 1991’s psychological-thriller Cape Fear saw Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese collaborate. The former plays a knife-wielding convict seeking revenge on his lawyer and his family, after being released from prison. The truly terrifying riverboat finale cements this one as a sure-fire success.

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films are better than books essay

Films are better than books essay

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Films are better than books essay

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Films are better than books essay

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